MUCH / MANY

  • Much (used with uncountables) and “many” (used with countables) are used mostly in interrogative or negative sentences.
    • Is there much water in the bottle?
    • I haven’t got much money with me.
    • I don’t read many books on holidays.
    • Do you know many famous people?

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  • We use “how much” and “how many” while asking for amounts. “How much” must be folloed with an uncountable noun, whereas for “how many” this noun must be countable.

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  • “Too many” and “too much” conveys that the action taken or the amount of the object is more than necessary.
    • You are watching too much TV.
    • I have too many cows.

 

 

A LITTLE / A FEW

 

  • “A few” must be used with plural countable nouns, and “a little” must be used with uncountable nouns.
    • There are a few books on the shelf.
    • I need a little sugar. I will have coffee.

 

  • “Several” is similar to “a few”; though it might be more than two, the amount referred to is fewer than many.
    • I spent several minutes on the exercise.

 

  • “Quite a few”, “quite a little”: fairly large number, many.
    • There are quite a few students in class. Over twenty.

 

  • “Few” and “little” (without the “a” before the word): not many but more than one. It can also be used with the word “very” as well.
    • There are few schools in the town. Therefore the classrooms are very crowded.
    • I have got very little coffee. We can’t have coffee.

 

  • “Few” can be replaced with the word “only a few” as well.
    • There are only a few schools in the town. Therefore the classrooms are very crowded.