SOME & ANY

schlechte horror spiele den der ler sidst ler bedst ruby laser autonivel there SOME

“Some” is one of the words that we can come across quite often in daily speech, and refers to a certain unspecified number, amount, degree, etc. Its use can differentiate based on the sentence structure and the particular context. When used with countable nouns it conveys the meaning of “a few”, and when used with uncountable nouns it conveys the meaning of “a small amount”. When used with countable nouns, the nouns become plural; when used with uncountable nous, the nouns remain singular. Due to its structure and the particular meaning it conveys, “some” is usually used in positive sentences. The different uses of “some” is explained below:

 

  • With countable nouns:

 

  • I have got some questions for you.
  • They have already gotten some offers to buy their car.
  • I went to the cinema with some of my friends yesterday.
  • I think I’d better put some flowers on the table.
  • Some students only come to school because they want to have fun, not because they want to learn.
  • It’s natural for some trees to lose their leaves in the autumn.

 

  • With uncountable nouns: 

 

  • I need to buy some food for the cat.
  • There’s some butter in the fridge.
  • I said it was a good idea to take some cash with us.
  • They are looking for someone with some experience.
  • The doctor gave my son some medicine for his throat.

 

  • Interrogative and negative form 

 

  • In certain cases “some” can be used in interrogative and negative sentences as well. When used in interrogatives, the answer would be either “yes” or “no”, and the person asking the question usually expects to hear the answer “yes.” For example:
    • Have you got some milk?
    • Jack, can you lend me some money for candy?
    • How about some help with that?

 

  • It was a very long journey and I’m dying of thirst. Have you got some water?
    • In the question “have you got some water,” the issue to pay attention to is that the use of “some” hints that the person asking the question expects to hear the answer “yes.” As you will see below, when “some” is replaced with “any”, the question becomes open to both “yes” and “no” as answers. For the “some” interrogatives that expect the answer “yes” are called “weak form.” On the other hand we cannot use singular nouns in the “strong form.” For example, the sentence “I’m looking for some movie to watch” is grammatically incorrect. Instead we should say “I’m looking for a movie to watch. An example for the “strong form” would be: “Why do some people get more mosquito bites than other people?”

 

  • Although the use of “some” is not common in negative sentences, it is still possible to come across:
    • I don’t like some of the movies he made.
    • That is to say, “I do not like them all;” or “I liked 3 of the movies he made, but not all.”

 

  • Its use with “any”:
    • I don’t like any of the movies he made.
      • That is to say, “I did not even like one of his movies.”

 

 

  • Other related phrases:

 

  • We can see “some” being used in presenting a proposal or making a request. Due to the nature of the English language, these sentences would be formed as a question, though their meaning would not connote a question.
    • Would you like some more cake?
    • May I have some of your time?

 

  • “Some” can also be used with numbers
    • A structural survey revealed that some £25 million was needed for its restoration.
    • Some 70 percent of the oxygen we breathe is provided by underwater life.

 

  • “Some can also be used as a pronoun. In such cases the noun is either already known, or the noun can be guessed based on the context.
    • I have just made a pot of tea. Would you like some?
    • Some say the world will end in fire, some say in ice. (Fire and Ice by Robert Frost)

 

  • “Some of” can be used to refer to a piece or part of a larger piece. Demonstrative or personal pronouns can follow “some of”.
    • He said after the exam that he wasn’t sure about some of the answers.
    • She’s not that funny but some of her jokes were very funny.

 

  • Typical Errors:

 

  • Although we already gave a few examples about the common mistakes in use of “some”, it is still beneficial to give additional examples here:

 

  • “Some” cannot be used with countable singular nouns.
    • Employees were asked to produce a brochure about the company’s history. (incorrect use: some brochure)

 

  • “Some” can be used before uncountable nouns, but without “a” or “an”.
    • I am looking for some accommodation around the Sericas area. (incorrect use: an accommodation)

 

  • Other examples of incorrect use:
    • Were there any changes lately?

No, there weren’t any. (incorrect: No, there weren’t some)

  • We got away for a few days. (incorrect use: For some days)

 

ANY

  • Unlike “some,” “any” can be used both with countable and uncountable nouns. When used with a countable noun, the noun must be plural; when used with an uncountable noun, the noun must be in singular form. “Any” is used fairly often in negative and interrogative sentences:
    • Have you got any money?
    • If you need any further information please contact us.
    • Have you got any brothers or sisters?
    • There aren’t any chocolate bars left.

 

  • “Any” is used in two different forms, as emphasized and not-emphasized types.

 

  • The not-emphasized type is generally used for nouns of uncertain amounts. We can use it in interrogatives and negative sentences as well. In positive sentences, however, we use “some” instead of “any.”
    • Have you got any questions?
    • I haven’t got any questions.
    • I’ve got some questions.
    • (Incorrect use: I’ve got any questions)

 

  • The not-emphasized “any” can only be used with uncountable and plural nouns.
    • Do I need to get any water for this?
    • There aren’t any clean spoons in the kitchen table.

 

  • The emphasized “any” gives the meaning of “does not matter which or what.” Limitless things usually have positive meaning.
    • Please contact us via e-mail or telephone for any information about our services.
    • My travel companion was happy to go to any destination with me.
    • Is there any form of agreement as to who owns what share in the property?
    • Are there any colors we can’t see?

 

  • “Any” can also be used as a pronoun. In such cases the noun is already known or can be guessed.
    • Have you got some 50 cents on you?

Sorry, I don’t think I have any.

  • Did they have any news for you?

No, they didn’t have any.

  • Those pancakes were delicious don’t you think?

I don’t know. I didn’t get any.

 

  • “Any of” comes before articles, demonstrative pronouns, personal pronouns and possessives.
    • Have you visited any of these movie locations?
    • (incorrect use: any these movie locations)

 

  • Similar to “some of,” “any of” can also be used to refer to the piece of a larger whole.
    • Are any of you interested in going skiing?
    • I couldn’t answer any of the exam questions.
    • I really didn’t understand any of their work.

 

  • “Not any” and “no”:
    • When used by itself, “any” does not connote a negative meaning. In order to convey the same meaning with “no,” it has to be used in a negative form.
      • There aren’t any seats left. All of them are already booked. There are no seats left. All of them are already booked.
      • She hasn’t got any space for her clothes.
      • She has no space for her clothes.
      • There weren’t any unexpected problems so we finished the job on time.
      • There were no unexpected problems so we finished the job on time.

 

  • “Any” or “every”
    • Although both of these quantifiers are used while speaking of a piece in a larger whole, their meaning is not the same:
      • Any student can easily access online library services.
      • Every student can easily access online library services.
    • When we analyze the two sentences below contextually, we would realize that “every” refers to the whole, whereas “any” refers to only one piece in that whole:
      • I can go to the movies with you any evening.
      • I can go to the movies with you every night.

 

  • “Any” can also be used with comparative adjectives.
    • You can’t get there any faster than this. This is the fastest way to reach there.
    • I thought that exam couldn’t get any harder than that.

 

  • Typical errors:

 

  • “Any” cannot be used with singular countable nouns.
    • They already use a “cloud” based information system so they don’t need a main server.
    • (incorrect use: so they don’t need any main server)

 

  • When referring to all members of a group, we use “every” instead of “any.”
    • His game room is awesome. It has every type of game equipment in it.
    • (incorrect use: It has any type of game equipment in it)

 

  • When beginning a sentence, “any” cannot be used by itself. It must be used wither with “no”, or with “not” prior to “any.”
    • There were no wars between two sides since 1979.
    • There weren’t any wars between two sides since 1979.
    • (Incorrect use: There were any wars)

 

  • In sentences that connote an unknown amount, we use “some” instead of “any.”
    • I am going to purchase some sporty shoes this week.
    • (incorrect use: I am going to purchase any sporty shoes this week)

 

 

SOME? / ANY? / A-AN?

 

  • Have you got anyinteresting books?
  • Have you got abook or a pencil in your rucksack?
  • Is there anymilk in the kitchen? – Yes, there is some.
  • Is there anytea in the cup? – No, there isn’t any. That was an interesting movie, don’t you think?
  • Have Smith’s got anychildren?
  • I’m having some tea with biscuits. Would you like some?