VERBS NOT USED WITH CONTINUOUS TENSES

schlechte horror spiele Some verbs such as “like, know, need” cannot be used with continuous tenses, since they cannot take the suffix “-ing”. For example we can say “I like football”, but cannot say “den der ler sidst ler bedst I’m liking football”. Such verbs convey a situation; no physical or mental action is taken. These verbs are known as “non-continuous”, “stative” or “state” verbs.

  • ruby laser autonivel there Verbs of feeling and thinking


Think

Believe

Know

Understand

See

Suppose

Mean

Remember

Forget

Imagine

Recognize

Realize

Hope

Guess

Matter

Deserve

Need

Like

Dislike

Hate

Love

Prefer

Want

Wish

Require

 

 

  • Verbs of perception and being

These verbs are also known as “linking verbs” and combine subjects and objects. 

Seem, sound, taste, smell, feel, taste, look, appear, resemble, keep, be (am, is are)

 

  • Verbs of possession  

Have

Own

Possess

Belong to

Owe

 

  • Measurement states

Include

Cost

Contain

Weigh

Fit

Consist of

Equal

 

VERBS THAT CAN BE STATE OR ACTION VERBS

 

The meaning of the below verbs change according to the context; they can either convey a situation or an action. In the case where they convey an action, they can be used in the continuous tense:

  • Have

I have a car.

I’m having dinner now.

  • Think

I think you are right.

Mmm… I’m thinking.

  • Be

 You’re rude.

You’re being rude these days.

  • See

I see what you mean.

I’m seeing the doctor tomorrow.

  • Look

The picture looks wonderful.

The boy is looking outside.

  • Smell

 This perfume smells nice.

The woman is smelling the rose.

 

■ The verbs “feel, ache, hurt” can be used both as a noun (the name of the feeling) and as a verb (the action of feel/hurt). Similarly, “look” can be used as a noun (how one seems) and a verb (to look somewhere).

I feel ill. / I’m feeling ill.

My back aches. / My back is aching.

 

■ Verbs such as “see, hear, smell, feel, understand, remember” can be commonly used with “can” and “could.”

Can you hear me?

I can see it.